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What Do You Notice? poster – Fractions on the Geoboard

What Do You Notice? poster – Fractions on the Geoboard

I just hosted my sixth fabulous Family Math Night event of the school year and with it came another new What Do You Notice? poster.  Here are the deets:
Title:  Fractions on the Geoboard
Skills

K-2:  shapes, counting, area

3-5:  congruency, area, fractions, equivalent fractions

Background Information: This is similar to the Squares and More Squares poster.  Like that one, this was designed around fractions but at a higher level.  The dots for each square represent the dots on a regular geoboard.  Each square is made up of 5 by 5 dots.  If lines were drawn connecting each of the dots, the larger square would show 16 small squares (4 x 4 small squares).  Each of these small squares represents one square unit.

I divided each of the large squares into fourths.  The third and fifth squares on the poster are the easiest representations of fourths.  It is also easy to see equivalent fractions such as ½ = 2/4.

Upper elementary students can figure out the area of the sections by counting the square units.  Just like in the Squares and More Squares poster, I deliberately made different shapes with the same area because sometime students will think that because the shape is different, the area must be different, as well.

Some students may notice congruency.  For example, in the first square, two of the sections are identical (congruent) even though the orientations are different.

Here’s what it looked like at the event:

Play-N-Take and Make-N-Take Logos

Play-N-Take and Make-N-Take Logos

 

Play-N-Take logo                         Make-N-Take logo

Our logos for our Family Math Night Take-Home kits are done!  A little behind schedule but all good things are worth the wait!

These Take-Home kits were designed to continue the learning at home! Here are the deets:

Send your families home with games they can play over and over. Used to supplement a Family Math Night event or use separately, these Take Home kits are a great way to engage parents in their child’s learning. We have two different kits to choose from.

Click the images above for even more details.

 

Family Math Night What Do You Notice? Poster

Family Math Night What Do You Notice? Poster

The Common Core State Standards in Mathematics is really emphasizing number lines in student work with numbers.  So I thought I’d include one on a What Do You Notice? Poster at last night’s Family Math Night event.  But in order to reflect both the primary and intermediate grades, not only did I include the counting numbers, but I marked the fourths, as well.

Some students noticed the color pattern I used – even numbers are blue and odd are red.  Then the half was yellow and so on.  I also put a little dot to mark the halfway point between 0 and 5 and a lot of students picked up on that.  No-one converted fractions to decimals but my favorite comment was from Kelsey who noticed that “there are 20/4 in all on the graph”.

what do you notice7

Family Math Night Activity: Snowflake Quilt

Family Math Night Activity: Snowflake Quilt

Thumbnail_Snowflake

Here’s another super fun collaborative projects I did at my last Family Math Night event. As I was doing research for the project I realized just how much math there is in one tiny snowflake. That’s why snowflakes are my latest passion!

Click the image to the left to get the lesson plan and check out other great STEAM projects!

 

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Family Math Night Activity: Building a Honeycomb

Family Math Night Activity: Building a Honeycomb

Thumbnail_Honeycomb

I’ve been wanting to try out an idea I had for our Family Math Night events and, since we were trying out our newest kit, Gellin’ with Geometry, it was the perfect opportunity.

My idea was to have a project that all the participants contributed to so that at the end of the event, we would have one big something to share.  In keeping with the geometry theme, I decided to include a station where participants could made one honeycomb cell.  As the cells were completed, we could begin to put them all together.

What a success!!  It was one of the most popular stations.  And the result was phenomenal.

It was so much fun doing that I wanted to share it with others.  So I put together a short video describing the process and the math.  BTW, this activity can easily be done in a classroom setting, as well!   If you’re interested in the lesson plan and other great STEAM projects, click the image above.

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