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Power Packs and Math Homework

Power Packs and Math Homework

Everyone loves to play games.  They’re engaging, motivating, and fun.  And from an educational perspective, they can be a powerful learning tool.  Here’s what games can do:

    • reinforce skills learned in the classroom
    • develop mental math skills
    • encourage strategic thinking
    • foster mathematical communication
    • build confidence
    • engage parents

But one of the best things about games is that they offer meaningful practice in a way where kids actually want to do math.  That’s because games, by their very nature, are fun.  It’s not too hard to entice a child to play a game.  And because of that, games offer important practice in a way that worksheets can’t.

When it comes to homework, we need to tap into the innate interest and motivation that games provide so that we can help parents sneak in some important math reinforcement.  It’s no secret that the more engaged parents are in their child’s education, the better their children do in school.  And current research says that homework can be effective when it piques students’ interests, doesn’t take too long, and allows repeated exposure to master new skills.  Games fit the bill on each of these.

So let’s make it easy to engage ALL parents in their child’s learning by periodically sending home games for homework instead of worksheets.

This is where our Power Packs come in.  These Power Packs are filled with engaging dice games created specifically for parents to play with their children.  Not only are the games fun but we took great care to design them around the skills students are learning in the classroom.

Each Pack comes with the games and game pieces needed so all you have to do is pop the Pack in students’ backpacks.  It’s as simple as that.  Soon, parents and kids will be enjoying the games together – not to mention each other’s company!

To give you an idea how this might work as a part of your classroom routine, we put together an introductory letter and weekly game take-home slip (2 pages) that you can send home to families.  And with conferences coming up, it’s the perfect opportunity to introduce the game packs to parents.  In fact, you may also want to share this fabulous TED Talk that underscores the importance of practice – or what the speaker calls the learning zone.

Of course, the Power Packs are also perfect for your Family Math Night event.  Here’s how we use them at our events.

 

Homework the FUN Way

Homework the FUN Way

Everyone loves to play games.  They’re engaging, motivating, and fun.  And from an educational perspective, they can be a powerful learning tool.  Here’s what games can do:

    • reinforce skills learned in the classroom
    • develop mental math skills
    • encourage strategic thinking
    • foster mathematical communication
    • build confidence
    • engage parents

But one of the best things about games is that they offer meaningful practice in a way where kids actually want to do math.  That’s because games, by their very nature, are fun.  It’s not too hard to entice a child to play a game.  And because of that, games offer important practice in a way that worksheets can’t.

When it comes to homework, we need to tap into the innate interest and motivation that games provide so that we can help parents sneak in some important math reinforcement.  It’s no secret that the more engaged parents are in their child’s education, the better their children do in school.  And current research says that homework can be effective when it piques students’ interests, doesn’t take too long, and allows repeated exposure to master new skills.  Games fit the bill on each of these.

So let’s make it easy to engage ALL parents in their child’s learning by periodically sending home games for homework instead of worksheets.

This is where our Power Packs come in.  These Power Packs are filled with engaging dice games created specifically for parents to play with their children.  Not only are the games fun but we took great care to design them around the skills students are learning in the classroom.

Each Pack comes with the games and game pieces needed so all you have to do is pop the Pack in students’ backpacks.  It’s as simple as that.  Soon, parents and kids will be enjoying the games together – not to mention each other’s company!

To give you an idea how this might work as a part of your classroom routine, we put together an introductory letter and weekly game take-home slip (2 pages) that you can send home to families.  And with conferences coming up, it’s the perfect opportunity to introduce the game packs to parents.  In fact, you may also want to share this fabulous TED Talk that underscores the importance of practice – or what the speaker calls the learning zone.

Of course, the Power Packs are also perfect for your Family Math Night event.  Here’s how we use them at our events.

As always, our goal is to support you in your support of parents.  If you have any questions about our Power Packs, or any of our Family Math Night products, feel free to email us at info@familymathnight.com.

The Power of the Estimation Jar

The Power of the Estimation Jar

We often think of math as the exact-answer subject.  But the kind of math that we do most often during the day doesn’t require an exact answer.  We use this particular math skill when we need to figure out how much time we need to get ready in the morning.  Or whether we have enough gas in the car to get to work. Or whether $50 is enough to cover the items in our shopping cart.

The math skill we use the most is, of course, estimation. And estimating accurately requires a high level of math.  That’s because it’s abstract which means we need to tap into our number sense and reasoning skills.

One way to provide our students with opportunities to work on their estimation skills is during computation practice.  Instead of diving right in to figure out 15 x 12, have students come up with an estimate…about what the answer will be. In fact, periodically I ask students NOT to determine the exact answer and, instead, have them turn in their work with only their estimates recorded.  This is hard for them to do in the beginning because they are so used to working out arithmetic problems, but they soon learn the value in thinking about the problem first.

A fun way to get students to work on their estimating skills is through the estimation jar.  I’ve included two of my estimation videos below.  The first video describes using the estimation jar in the classroom as a way to develop, not only estimation skills, but place value and number sense, as well.

The second video is filled with tips on setting up your estimation table at your Family Math Night event.  It includes something I’ve been adding to my estimation tables recently – the use of a referent.

You’ll find in both videos that there is a heavy emphasis on getting students to think about and make sense of numbers.  I discovered an example of this in action one day while cleaning up after a Family Math Night event.  It was such a powerful example of number sense that I’m now including “thinking” paper at my estimation stations.  If you missed the newsletter where I describe this priceless find, check it out here.  And click here to get the pdf of the thinking paper I’m now using.

A Twist on the Estimation Jar – Classroom Version

Setting up the Estimation Table at your Family Math Night event

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New Family Math Night Collaborative Projects: Fish Bowl and Fraction Quilt

New Family Math Night Collaborative Projects: Fish Bowl and Fraction Quilt

In addition to using the 8 stations in our Family Math Night kits, I usually include a ninth station where I set up a Collaborative Project.  I did the soccer ball project at my first event this year but then created two brand new ones that I’m excited to share with you:  Fraction Quilt and Fish Bowl.

quilt3

fish-bowl

In Fraction Quilt, participants cut different colored squares into triangles and use those triangles to design their quilt square. Some of the math they’ll discover along the way are halves, unit fractions and equivalent fractions.  At the advanced level, there’s an option to tie in symmetry.

 

In Fish Bowl, participants will be creating super cute fish from colorful cardstock.  At the beginning and intermediate levels the focus is on geometric shapes and measuring with a ruler.  At the advanced level, participants will be measuring the area of their fish in square centimeters.  The best part is all the fun crafty materials participants will use to decorate their fish. Any time there’s glue, it’s going to be a lot of fun!

 

As always, I put together a video version of each of my Collaborative Projects.  Here are the ones for these projects.  By the way, if you’d like to automatically get my new videos as they are published, I’d love for you to subscribe to my YouTube Channel.  Not only do I have a whole bunch of Collaborative Projects but I also have some curriculum content videos.  Click here to check it out and subscribe.

 

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